denise zygadlo

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The Amorist - feature online

The Amorist - feature online

http://www.widewalls.ch/arusha-gallery-group-exhibition-2017/
Amorist

Amorist

Delighted to be taking part in Amorist at Arusha Gallery Edinburgh. I have started a new project on a larger scale working with transfer print on linen. The piece in the exhibition is Rebound ll and the show opens on Thursday 9th March 6pm - 8pm
VAS 2016

VAS 2016

Tara Vll was selected for VAS 2016 open exhibition in the Royal Scottish Academy building.
Royal Glasgow Institute of FineArt  annual open 2016

Royal Glasgow Institute of FineArt annual open 2016

Very pleased to have been selected for RGI 2016, my first time.
SSA 2016 at RSA

SSA 2016 at RSA

Delighted to have had Loincloth lll accepted in this years SSA exhibition at RSA. The show runs till November 24th
Cupar Arts Festival 2016

Cupar Arts Festival 2016

Delighted to be invited to take part in Liminal, drawing exhibition at Cupar Arts Festival by Kirsty Whiten, who is co-curating the show. Looking forward to the launch on 18th June. My drawing is Retrieve, taken from original collage of photocopies printed on silk.
Spring Fling 2016

Spring Fling 2016

This year I will be studio 64! Please drop by and see the new drawings and projects I have been working on this year. The fabulous Spring Fling brochure is now available and packed full of goodies to delight you and show you the way.......
cloth matters

cloth matters

..the stove network, Dumfries very kindly housed my installation, cloth matters, 13th - 17th April in their fabulous new cafe. It consisted of 3 piles of cloth addressing daily life, ceremony and crisis. On the cafe tables customers could add a story or memory relating to cloth, by writing on a luggage label which was then placed in the growing scrapbook of cloth moments. Outside, hanging from the cherry trees, were completed labels for passers by to read. On 15th throughout the day I performed a 5 minute personal response to cloth in the window.
Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time

In 1996 I made a wall hanging as a community project in Thornhill, Dumfries. To celebrate the 20th anniversary I will be resident for 4 days at Thomas Tosh, where the hanging lives, to give it a clean and talk to visitors about the individual pieces made by around 50 people, including members of Wallace Hall Primary 7. Many stories and facts were collected before stitching everything together and quilting the finished piece.
Not To Scale

Not To Scale

I am delighted to be curating Not to Scale, an exhibition of costumes by Alex Rigg, at Gracefield Art Centre Dumfries July - September 2016 Visitors will enter a world of fantastic and fabulous garments and the extraordinary thought process that integrates design, making and live performance. The costumes are made as art objects, to be seen at close quarters and Not to Scale will provide an insight into the various strands that come together to form the end product, with Alex on site and making for some of the time. A programme of associated events will make this very much an active exhibition and an intriguing experience. photo by Brian Hartley
Black and White exhibition at The Yellow Door

Black and White exhibition at The Yellow Door

Black & White Exhibition - Private View Black & White Please join us for a glass of wine to launch a group exhibition of art works in black & white. Private View Friday 23rd October 6 - 9pm Join our facebook event Copyright © 2015 Yellow Door Group, All rights reserved. Our mailing address is: Yellow Door Group Shop & Gallery at The Yellow Door 16 Queen Street Dumfries, DG1 2JF United Kingdom
Environmental Art Fair Scotland 2015

Environmental Art Fair Scotland 2015

The second EAFS happened around Morton Catsle looking out over the loch. Artists from Dumfries and Galloway, UK, Europe, Canada and maybe more contributed to walks, camp-fire talks, installations, meditations, performance and other creative activities - including a spherical clay oven made on site to bake pizzas and a communal bbq to cook and share food brought by the visitors - which later grew into a spectacular river of fire. Riders on horseback lined the horizon on Saturday evening, having travelled 7 hours to bring the healing waters from Moffat, ululating across the loch before making their way round it and, thrillingly, galloping up the hill. Various other journeys were made to the Castle; a river walk from Dumfries, cycle rides and I made a photo journey - as far as the eye can see - taking a photo at every bend in the road and numbering each station on posts, branches etc which I recorded in a zyg-zag book-in-a-box. I put together four other random boxes loosely based on the elements and alluding vaguely to some of the events in the programme to secrete around the area and I filled them with curious and apparently unrelated objects for the delight of the discoverer. The weekend closed with an impromptu performance halfway up the outside of the sunlit castle by a cabaret cross-dresser in a leather mini skirt and lycra shorts, knee length socks with diamente suspenders and the use of a chiffon scarf to accentuate hand gestures. Biographical songs eco-politically themed resounded across the water to bicycle powered music. Fabulously camp and deliciously bizarre. What better way to end a perfect couple of days. Image of an attempt at art in the landscape.
Urbane Art

Urbane Art

Urbane Art opened their exhibition Retina last night as part of Scotlands festival of photography. Two of my canvas-works were selected for the show. Urbane Art, 25-27 Jeffrey Street, Edinburgh July 17th - July 31st 2015
Spring Fling 2015 - Studio 65

Spring Fling 2015 - Studio 65

You are invited to Studio 65. Opening times: Friday 22nd May 5p.m. - 8p.m. Saturday 23rd May 10.30a.m. - 8p.m. Sunday 24th May 10.30a.m. - 8p.m. Monday 10.30a.m. - 8p.m.

Spring fling 2015 in Berlin

Spring Fling is exhibiting in Berlin throughout April. Twelve artists from Dumfries and Galloway have been chosen to show their work in the Green Hill Gallery. Really excited to have two of my hangings in the showe and to take part in a short performance at the launch.
SSA 2014

SSA 2014

Delighted to have 2 works accepted by SSA 2014 in RSA Edinburgh 5th - 20th December Loincloth 2 and Soles
Changing Room performance by The Electric Youth Theatre

Changing Room performance by The Electric Youth Theatre

Tuesday 21st October 6pm Electric Youth Theatre Munchies Street, Dumfries RSVP to hotwomen@gmail.com
Changing Room

Changing Room

I have been working on a project with Jo Hodges exploring the menopause. We ran 2 creative workshop days with 2 groups of women and have put together an exhibition using the work created on those days and further developments of our own. This will be an interactive exhibition and we hope folk will com along and spend some time looking through the details of the components that make up the show. The Dumfries part of the show will open with a short performance by members of The Electric Youth Theatre, as an ironic twist!
WRAP - a saunter through Gallery 2 video

WRAP - a saunter through Gallery 2 video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv4bBl7anv4&feature=share
WRAP

WRAP

Drop-in sessions - meet the artist: Saturday 19th July, Saturday 2nd August 2pm-4pm
Wrap opening

Wrap opening

Performance Gallery 2 Gracefield Arts Centre Saturday July 12th at 1pm and 2pm Performers: Denise Zygadlo, Florencia Garcia Chafuen, Tara Hodgson. String quartet: Gongbo Jiang, Wen Wang, Robert Thurlow and Alex McQuiston. Composer: Rudi Zygadlo. Photo: Zvonko Kracun.
The wrapper and the wrapped

The wrapper and the wrapped

Interview with Mary Gladstone for artwork newspaper http://www.artwork.co.uk/text/9.php.
Wynden Tree

Wynden Tree

Another adventure with Oceanallover mushrooming in Dunbar and Loch Lomond. Fabulous locations and extraordinary extravagance with delightful performers and fabulous musicians - always a wonder! http://www.oceanallover.co.uk/Pages/Wynden.html
Spring Fling/Recoat Rural Mural Project

Spring Fling/Recoat Rural Mural Project

Enjoyed a totally new experience working with the talented mural painter Fraser Gray on a gable end in Keir, Dumfries. This is part of a new project for Spring Fling in partnership with Recoat, bringing visitors to unusual corners of Dumfries and Galloway where artists abound! http://vimeo.com/95804445
Kalopsia Gallery Textile Illustration Exhibition

Kalopsia Gallery Textile Illustration Exhibition

Kalopsia Gallery at Ocean Terminal, The Shore, Leith, Edinburgh showing textile illustration in their next show 14th - 30th March 2014 I have 2 drawings from my derriere series in this show
Preparing for Wrap : Zvonko Kracun

Preparing for Wrap : Zvonko Kracun

Friday 28th February Zvonko worked all day taking photographs of my work in preparation for Wrap and a new printed hanging. Beautiful sunny day at last.
Spring Fling Rural Mural Project

Spring Fling Rural Mural Project

This year Spring Fling has teamed up with Glasgow based street art collective Recoat to create the Rural Mural project - 5 Spring Fling artists will be working with 5 urban artists to create artworks across Dumfries and Galloway. I was teamed with Edinburgh based mural painter Fraser Gray for a mural in Keir village - brilliant fun!
Performance at the launch of Cloth and Memory 2

Performance at the launch of Cloth and Memory 2

Helen Cerina, an Italian choreographer, created a performance specifically for the launch of Cloth and Memory 2, an exhibition of 23 international textile artists, at Salts Mill, Saltaire, Yorkshire on 17th August 2013. The performers wore woolen sweaters that had been sewn together, restricting their movements or forcing them to move together. I took part in this performance with Helen and 2 other performers - a 20 year old and an 80 year old - accompanied by the local brass band, in the cobbled courtyard outside the mill. The age difference created an added tension and sensitivity to the piece. The performance ended with an invitation to the audience to join in a celebration of rock and roll! http://transparentboundaries.com/blog/2013/08/30/transparent-boundaries-at-cloth-memory-2/ www.clothandmemory.com cloth and memory 2 home page

Wrap

Solo show at Gracefield Arts Centre Dumfries 12 July - 9 August 2014 A development of Involutus Memet with new work, new performance and new music in Gallery 2

Dying Villages - the artefacts

An exhibition at Catstrands, New Galloway featuring a project by poet Tom Pow, incorporating a series of collaborative poems/collages by Tom and myself. The exhibition will continue till June 29th

Appraisal by Jeremy Carlisle

Appraisal by Jeremy Carlisle is up online at above address - very pleased! http://www.a-n.co.uk/interface/reviews/single/3370928

Pollen

have a look at : www.oceanallover.co.uk/pages/POLLEN.html

Spring Fling 2013 mentoring scheme

Laura Perry Mentored by Denise Zygadlo Specialising in printed textiles, Laura Perry graduated from Glasgow School of Art with a BA Honours in Textile Design in 2011. Inspired by architectural structures and their range of colours, Laura likes to contrast harsh lines and geometric shapes with soft fluid fabrics. Now 24, Laura spent periods of her childhood with family in Dumfries and Galloway and continues to find inspiration in the region, travelling from her home in South Ayrshire. Laura, in the run up to Spring Fling will be mentored by Denise Zygadlo an artist whose primary interest is the exploration of the relationship between the human body and cloth. Laura will show her work during Spring Fling 2013.
Scottish Society of Artists 2013

Scottish Society of Artists 2013

The annual show of SSA opens next Friday 1st March at the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh. 2 works accepted - Rest 3 and Rest 4, both transfer prints on canvas.
Involutus Memet - a critical appraisal by Jeremy Carlisle

Involutus Memet - a critical appraisal by Jeremy Carlisle

Photocopies of the artist’s body variously wrapped in cloth then transfer-printed onto chiffon, canvas and calico make up series of works: hangings, wall pieces, and a ‘book of folds’. These were on show at The Mill on the Fleet during September 2012, Gatehouse of Fleet, Galloway.

The title of the exhibition, Involutus Memet (wrapped up in myself) gives the spectator a clue to the meaning of these works. They are personal and intensely felt. Many have an ephemeral aspect but their presence is powerful. They resonate and stay in the mind.

A source of affirmation for Denise Zygadlo was the work of the conceptual artist Helen Chadwick, 1953 - 1996, a friend of the artist’s. Helen Chadwick’s work explores the relationship between the body and our sense of self, the body and memory. On completing the work for Involutus Memet Denise recognised that although her work was conceived without conscious reference to other works and was original in its inspiration, a record of a personal and particular journey, a form of autobiography if you will, there was a kind of kinship, affinity with the work of a valued friend and companion. Two works of Chadwick’s that came to mind in this respect were ‘Ego Geometria Sum’ 1983 and ‘Of Mutability’ 1994.

‘Involutus Memet’ begins with the artist’s own body, which is then represented in different works in different ways. All the images in the exhibition start their life by the artist laying her head, hand, arm, elbow, shoulder, back, legs, feet, etc., onto the glass bed of a photocopier. We are reminded here that we are physical beings subject to physical laws by the evidence in the prints of weight pressing onto a hard surface and the effect of that pressing on soft tissue. In the resulting images you also feel the weight of the skeleton– bones are surprisingly heavy, you can see the pressure of the bones beneath the skin. Sometimes it seems to age the body where the skin has been pressed into lines and wrinkles. You would normally associate these signs with the elderly. The artist is not elderly. A kind of metamorphosis is at work here too then. In contrast to this weight, in some of the pieces the figure has become weightless (a very different metamorphosis) this is particularly apparent in the four large hangings.

So, the process involved in making the work results in a kind of pressing. This is something in our normal lives we have no release from. It takes effort to pull ourselves around. We fall. The very word ‘fall’ is our culture’s metaphor for banishment from paradise. Weightiness, earth, imprisonment. How do we deal with this weight? We have the gift of movement, of energy, we can resist, for a time we can swim against it. We celebrate this movement in different ways. Given the lightness, near weightlessness of the chiffon the images of the hangings are printed onto they lend themselves to dreams of our selves being weightless, free of gravity. In a not dissimilar way this brings to mind one of the reasons why swimming is, for many people, so addictive; for the time we swim we are free of the tyrant gravity. Here though the figures swim in space.

The four works on chiffon hung from ceiling beams are large, approximately 9’ x 5’. In the Mill they were at right angles to each other but with space to walk around and between them. With a breeze coming in through open windows or simply by walking closely past them, the chiffon ripples, waves and sways. The images on the hangings are different views of the whole figure. They were produced by taking a photograph of collaged photocopies laid out on a large sheet of paper. The resulting photograph was then the source for the finalised digital prints on the chiffon, the dark tones of which are a deep sepia in colour.

A linking motif running through all the works in the exhibition is the relationship of the body to cloth. Whether it is in the detail of a hand or elbow in the smaller wall-works or the whole figure in the hangings; muslin, wool, tulle, these fabrics cover, wrap, lie beside hand, arm, neck, back etc. The figure is bound and unbound.

The human forms on the tall chiffon works are life-size. In some respects, at first glance, they suggest a cubist visual language, or possibly the grammar of photomontage works. The flat, overlapping pages of the original photocopies trigger such ideas. However these works have a language of their own. Moving, rippling in space as they do, they are not exclusively pictorial. They are kinetic sculptures as well as representational images. This duality is pertinent to our presence in the world. We exist physically but we also have a presence in the minds of others and in our own minds.

As mentioned the four hangings are four different views of the figure. The hanging of the front view of the artist has a clear symmetry, arms held out to the sides, feet together and head thrown back – of the head all you can clearly see is the under-lit neck and jaw. The head is thrown back into darkness. The feeling, with bands of muslin wrapping arms, hands and a leg isof a figure floating. The transparency of chiffon emphasises this feeling. You can choose to look straight through this body to the room and surroundings beyond.

The clothed body, the wrapped body, all carry associations, moods, cultural messages with them. This is a theme that runs through much of Zygadlo’s work. We are what we wear, what we wrap around our bodies. There is the aesthetic dimension to clothes as well - the movement of cloth, the sway of materials and their changing patterns of folds have an energy and life of their own. At the same time they are expressive of the energy and life of the body beneath.

Throughout history and the history of depiction, of art also, the clothed figure has been a vehicle for expression. The clothing and textiles of renaissance paintings and sculptures, for instance, were valued not just, where appropriate, for their gorgeousness, their role as symbols of power and status, their decorative qualities or by contrast when the subject required it, the raggedness of garments expressive of wretchedness, disease and poverty but also as expressive forms in their own right. I think Zygadlo’s contemporary works are linked to and are a part of this tradition, they embody and express different states of being. We are more than one person, our thoughts and emotions are hugely various, our bodies change. We are well and unwell. We are active and we rest. We are clothed and unclothed.

In the hanging of the back view of the figure a veil is lifted and extends into space beyond the head, as though caught by the wind. A kind of visual pun that is apparent in all the hangings. They are pictorial illusions, representations of cloth and the clothed figure but at the same time they also actually all exist as real cloth, as things in themselves and move in the same time frame and space as we do. Also in this work a child’s woollen, christening shawl has been wrapped around the back of the figure. Lace evening gloves are worn. These clothes carry stories. How evocative they are when we catch sight of such garments, the triggering of trains of thought, of family relationships, of memories and associations. The rites of passage we all witness and participate in, the christenings, marriages, anniversaries and funerals of our society. While looking at this work and works like it we experience a form of time travel, an escape from the body in the present. We leave it behind and float off into other realms as these chiffon figures appear to. Free to drift in our recollections and memories of particular events, to revisit the past and to understand and see that past in new and different ways.

The figures of these two hangings, a front view and the back view exist in some indefinable space. They aren’t anchored to the earth, to the ground. Feet rest on nothing. The works are not reducible to simple interpretations. They are more ambiguous, complicated. We could be sharing the space with phantoms or ghosts. Swathed in muslin the figures also bring to mind entombment scenes, ‘his body was taken and wrapped in a linen cloth.’ This is a form of free association, of conjecture that makes reference to the history of our Judeo-Christian culture. This doesn’t necessarily reflect the artist’s intentions. That said, intended or not iconography is an unavoidable factor in any figurative work and at some juncture all contemporary figurative work will be seen in the context of art’s histories and will inspire intended or unintended interpretations, musings.

The two remaining hangings, a side view of the body and a front view of the artist in a stepping pose are more directly expressive. The human body is capable of almost endless configurations. Formalised movement: ritual, performance, dance is, I think, another reference in these works. At the opening of the exhibition the artist and a collaborator gave a performance accompanied by music composed for the occasion. The hanging which represents a side-view of the figure could be interpreted as having the aspect of a still from a dance video - a long way from the iconography of entombment. The artist’s right arm is stretched at full length above the head, hand, with fingers splayed out, pointing straight upwards. One leg is bent as though in a dance step. There are dramatic jumps between the dark space surrounding the figure and the light of the figure itself and the light tones of the bands of muslin. This is typical of the striking contrasts in all the chiffon works between the clothed body and the darkness of the surrounding space. This effect of dark space, emptiness was arrived at by draping black cloth over the arm, foot, hand, etc., that was being photocopied. As the light washed under the glass it faithfully and paradoxically reproduced the inky nothingness of the cloth, achieving the resulting powerful presence of nothing. Is there an intention here to direct our imagination to the notion that we are essentially, within the measurable, finite limits of our physical selves, insubstantial and insignificant almost to the point of invisibility against the dark?

In the final hanging the figure is expressive of strong emotion. The head is held in both hands seemingly in some tension or anguish. The figure’s right leg is bent up into the body, the left leg stretches down into waves of cloth. Here it is as though we are looking at a foot through water. There are passages in these works that are simply extremely beautiful. The photocopier capturing the airy lightness of forms and the fine geometry of folded waves of the lightest cloth imaginable.

Contemplative and calm (the front and back). Dramatic and anguished (side view and head-in-hands). Both sets are constructed, made, by the addition of one photocopy to another until a figure is completed. At one moment these sheets are like strange weightless blocks of stone; stacked, balanced, tilted and horizontal in a clearly delineated fashion or again possibly they suggest giant playing cards. Blocks or cards, their arrangement is anything but arbitrary. Whether it is the tapered edges of the pages representing the arms in the ‘front pose’ that accentuate the feeling of an upwards movement or the clear almost architectonic structure evident in the arrangement of the ‘distressed’ figure - there is an anchored stability here that provides a startling and effective foil to the flow, movement, of body and cloth.

These chiffon works are delicate and subtle. At the same time they are powerful and they repay the time you spend with them. They haunt the imagination.

In contrast to the tall chiffon ‘mobiles’ inhabiting the centre of the gallery the ‘Veil Works’ and the ‘Canvas Works’ are more discreet. They are relatively still, quiet, anchored to the gallery wall. The ‘veil’ works are a series of small wall pieces, mostly no more than 12 inches in any one dimension. Layers of fabric are sewn and buttoned. You look through fabric to transfer-printed images of a heel or arm, or elbow say, alongside or wrapped in cloth - the play of looking through real cloth to an image of cloth. These veil works and four box-framed works where images have been transfer-printed onto old primed canvases that have been removed from their stretchers, are different in mood from the hangings. They are fixed and in the case of the framed images (the canvas works) are conventionally, as a consequence of the framing, at a slight remove, distance from us. As images they remain on one plane. They are, being of cloth and canvas, tactile but you can’t walk round them, they don’t share our space as is the case with the hangings. At the same time we know these arms, feet, hands, elbows, heels, are the artist’s. They aren’t anonymous. We respond to this: the lines, scars, wrinkles, pores, creases that leave their traces on the human body belong to an individual. The various histories of the human body are here in detail, in close up. These images too are monochrome, though with one or two exceptions, with less contrast than the hangings. This also gives them a quieter feel.

The medium of photocopying used in all the works in the show carries with it the passing of time. The photocopy makes permanent the moment. A fixed point in time reminds us that actually there is no stopping of time. The days and years leave their mark. There is one image on canvas, ‘Rest 4’ where the position of the arms seems to depict a figure resting. The artist lying on her back, arms above her head. All we actually see in the finalised picture are the arms at rest, palm of the one hand visible facing upwards. The other hand is under and supporting the forearm of the other arm. We need to stop, to lie down. Oddly by just focusing on this detail we are somehow made more aware of the nature of rest, undistracted by a face, by the figure. The making of these canvas works was labour intensive. The photocopy was transferred to the canvas using a dylon solution. Once dry the paper was peeled and rubbed away by hand leaving the image fixed to the canvas. This process occasionally leaves its marks where the ink is worn thin, edges become frayed. This process, it seems to me echoes the elements endlessly brushing past us throughout our lives. Streams of air, light, water and dust. Rubbing, soothing, scratching, wearing away, comforting. Warm, cold, rough and smooth. Everything leaves its mark on us. Our bodies are surfaces the world around us writes on. There are no shawls, veils or gloves here to remind us of the theatre our clothed bodies are involved in, more the mood is one of the passing of time. An elegy.

The most intimate work in the exhibition is the ‘Book of Folds’, a book of calico pages with images measuring mere inches in the centre of the pages. You look into these small pictures of folded cloth. It is only after a while that you realise that in two images, hidden amongst the cloth are glimpses of the sole of a foot in one and the back of a leg in the other. In this sense they continue the theme apparent in the canvas pieces. To my mind there is something of the spare, the simple, the unadorned in the feel of the relationship between body and cloth in all the images in the exhibition. Something essential. Apart from anything else there is no fine tailoring here, no colour, no velvets, brocade, quilted material. Rather the body and its clothing are timeless, they aren’t specific to a particular era, fashion or culture. They don’t pull you towards a narrow reference. Here arms are simply at rest with the comfort of linen, of muslin, of wool. This works because you aren’t reminded of associations that would be distracting. In conversation the artist said something extraordinary about the making of the work in the exhibition. It triggered a memory of an experience soon after the birth of her first child. Looking at the baby’s arm as she held her she couldn’t distinguish it from her own arm. She had a similar feeling while making the works shown in ‘Involutus Memet’. That when making the work and looking at it was as though she was somehow outside herself looking back at her self. It is a very strange and privileged experience to be momentarily elsewhere, to be a spectator to your own body. Looking at her baby the emotion was one of wonder, of complete identification with another. As though there was nothing to distinguish between herself and the object of her attention. This is only a shadow away from a very different out-of-body experience – the sense of depersonalisation experienced in moments of acute stress or anxiety when you seem to feel that your body is something alien to you, as though you are at an un-bridgeable distance from it, not in a neutral or disengaged way but with real alarm and fear. The exhibition contains both dark and light worlds. The body is dealt with for the most part in non-specific ways, as though a book where events aren’t narrowly interpreted or defined for us. This leaves room to consider that the world around is a frightening as well a comforting place. What control do we have over our health? We age and die. We are aware of and anguish at the ill health, suffering and death of those close to us. Our own minds can take us to dark places in unpredictable acts and strategies of self-damage, despair and aggression. We all carry a considerable amount of mental baggage around. It is a continual process to attempt to achieve some degree of equilibrium. Art helps us in this endeavour by reminding us who we are and how we can reflect from a distance on the complexities of our natures.

Photocopying your own human frame you can’t control or predict with any exactitude what the image will look like. There is no viewfinder or screen to check the composition before the button is pressed. This must enhance the surprise you feel as the machine rolls out its copy and you see it for the first time; a foot – how indescribably strange. A back, mine but now detached from me but it is more me than me as in fact I can’t actually see my own back. This one I can see as though you were creating your own body, giving birth to yourself. Then you set about building it into different forms and poses. Inspired by these works we can imaginatively make this journey ourselves. What is it like to see oneself as others see us? Would it be with some tenderness, compassion, awe? This fragile, ephemeral being that feels things so strongly.

Included in the exhibition were four haikus written by the artist. One line of each haiku came to the artist in a dream. This ‘given’ line was then added to in order to make up a completed haiku. It is a game for the visitor to the exhibition to guess which line was the dream line.

‘she lay unlinen like a dog
No comfort just the dust
Worn threadbare’

All the haikus relate to the visual work in their imagery. This combining of words from a dream and of being added to when awake echoes the physical work. We are awake, we clearly see the world around us but at the same time we dream on and this dreaming affects the way we see the world and the way we make art.

This is a remarkable body of work, pun intended. By using her own body, her self to make art the artist has given us the opportunity to reconsider who we are and what we are. We emerge from the stream of life, have a life, develop an identity, a self, a history. Then we disappear. Occasionally a footprint in the mud is fossilised or a body is preserved in a peat bog - these are prints of a kind. ‘Involutus Memet’ is just such a print.

Jeremy Carlisle

Photograph by Ken Smyth
Involutus Memet

Involutus Memet

Show continues till 23rd September at The Mill Exhibition Centre, Gatehouse of Fleet. The Mill also has an excellent riverside cafe and terrace, gift shop andbookshop Admission Free
Involutus Memet Performance

Involutus Memet Performance

Collaboration with Florencia Garcia Chafuen Rigg to music by Rudi Zygadlo From 2.30pm at The Mill, Gatehouse of Fleet, Dumfries and Galloway www.linkedin.com/pub/florencia-garcia-chafuen-rigg rudi-zygadlo.tumblr.com www.millonthefleet.co.uk
Involutus Memet

Involutus Memet

Forthcoming show of new work - silk hangings and canvasworks in the perfect venue of The Mill Exhibition Centre where 4 tall windows cast natural light on a large open space overlooking the river. Taking advantage of the size of the gallery area and its wooden floor, I have been working on a short performance with Florencia Chafuen Garcia Rigg to music created by Rudi Zygadlo.
Involutus Memet

Involutus Memet

Solo show at Mill on the Fleet Exhibition Centre New works / performance 18th August - 23rd September 2012
The SSA Prize

The SSA Prize

Prizes Awarded during SSA 2012 The SSA Prize Denise Zygadlo - Receive 1

SSA Annual Show

SSA Annual Show

The 115th Annual Open Exhibition The Royal Scottish Academy Building The Mound, Edinburgh Private View Friday, 3 February (5 – 9pm) Exhibition Open Saturday, 4 February – Thursday 1 March http://www.s-s-a.org/
Axolotl Gallery, Dundas Street, Edinbrugh

Axolotl Gallery, Dundas Street, Edinbrugh

Christmas show starts Friday 2nd December with drinks and mince pies from 6-9pm
SSA Professional members exhibition

SSA Professional members exhibition

Eastwood Park Gallery Rouken Glen Rd, Glasgow G46 6UG 3rd November - 1st December
Achtung!

Achtung!

Rudi Zygadlo - Achtung! September 2011 Pencil drawing for record label

http://rudi-zygadlo.tumblr.com/
 SSA Professional Members Exhibition

SSA Professional Members Exhibition

Glasgow Art Club 185 Bath Street Glasgow G2 4HU

8th - 29th August

Exhibition Opening Times : Monday - Friday 10am - 8pm

Invited Guest Artists Elizabeth Blackadder, John Houston, Philip Reeves
Spring Fling 2011

Spring Fling 2011

Despite being off the beaten track around 130 visitors found their way to the studio and it was a great way to launch the new space. Craft Scotland included the studio in a review and unexpected friends from the past and new contacts added to an exciting weekend.